Keynote Speeches



Recent Advances in Wireless Charging


  • Prof. Mohammed Ismail
  • Wayne State University, USA



  • Date: October 28, 2019 (Monday)
  • Time: 09:30 - 10:30
  • Venue: Evergreen Hall I, 2F

Biography:

Mohammed Ismail (S’80-M’82-SM’84-F’97) a prolific author and entrepreneur in the field of chip design and test, spent over 25 years in academia and industry in the US and Europe .He obtained his BS and MS from Cairo University, Egypt and His PhD from the University of Manitoba, Canada in 1983, all in electrical engineering.

He is the Founder of the Ohio State University’s (OSU) Analog VLSI Lab, one of the foremost research entities in the field of analog, mixed signal and RF integrated circuits and served as its Director. He also served on the Faculty of OSU’s ElectroScience Lab. He held a Research Chair at the Swedish Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) where he founded the RaMSiS (Radio and Mixed Signal Integrated Systems) Research Group there. He had visiting appointments in Finland (Aalto university), Norway (NTH and University of Oslo), the Netherlands (Twente University) and Japan (Tokyo Institute of Technology).

He Joined KUSTAR, the UAE in 2011, where he held the ATIC (now Mubadala Technology) Professor Chair and is Founding Chair of the ECE Department. He is the Founding Director of the Khalifa Semiconductor Research Center (KSRC) and Co-Director of the ATIC-SRC Center of Excellence on Energy Efficient Electronic systems (ACE4S) targeting selfpowered chip sets for wireless sensing and monitoring, bio chips and power management solutions. He recently joined Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan as Professor and Chair of the ECE Department. He maintained a an appointment with KUSTAR as an Adjunct professor. His current research focuses on ”self- healing” design techniques for CMOS RF and mm-wave ICs in deep nanometer nodes, energy harvesting and power management, wearable Biochips hardware security, and SoCs for IoTs.

Dr.Ismail served as a Corporate Consultant to over 30 companies and is a Co-Founder of Micrys Inc., Columbus, Ohio, Spirea AB, Stockholm, Firstpass Technologies Inc., Dublin, Ohio and ANACAD-Egypt (now part of Mentor Graphics/Siemens).

He advised the work of over 55 Ph.D. students and of over 100 M.S. students. He authored or co−authored over 20 books and over 170 journal publications, 300 conference papers and has 14 US patents issued and several pending. He is the Founding Editor of the Springer Journal of Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing and serves as the Journal’s Editor-inChief. He served the IEEE in many editorial and administrative capacities. He is the Founder of the IEEE International Conference on Electronics, Circuits and Systems (ICECS), the flagship Region 8 Conference of the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society and a Co-Founder of the IEEE International Symposium on Quality Electronic Design (ISQED). He received the US Presidential Young Investigator Award, the Ohio State Lumley Research Award four times, in 1992, 1997, 2002 and 2007, IEEE 2016 CAS Society best paper award and the US Semiconductor Research Corporation’s Inventor Recognition Award twice. He is a Fellow of IEEE.


Abstract:

The field of wireless power transfer (WPT) has been developing significantly. Wireless Power Transfer completely eliminates the existing high tension power transmission lines, cables, and towers. Electric Vehicles (EV) have been proposed to achieve green transportation. Even though EV usage is currently increasing, a technology breakthrough would be required to overcome battery related drawbacks. Wireless power transfer provides inherent electrical isolation and reduces on board charging cost, weight and volume.

Nevertheless, WPT for EVs pose additional challenges and sustainability trade-offs and concerns that have stimulated discussion in academia and industry. In this presentation, we first review existing technologies for both stationary and dynamic charging of vehicles. We then propose a wireless power transfer technology using microwaves for the wireless charging of stationary EVs. It involves the design of a beam forming phased array antenna as a transmitter (TX) distributed on the parking walls or on garage walls that transmit power to the receiver antenna existing in the car. We use a phased array antenna technology to control and adjust the microwave power beam in order to increase efficiency and to reduce unexpected radiation outside of the receiving antenna. The harvested RF power is converted into DC supply to charge the battery while the EV parks over night by using an appropriate rectenna circuit.





Detect and Predict Epileptic Seizures: A Multidisciplinary Approach


  • Prof. Mohamad Sawan
  • Chair Professor
  • Westlake University
  • Leave of Absence from Polytechnique Montreal, Canada
  • Date: October 28, 2019 (Monday)
  • Time: 10:50 - 11:50
  • Venue: Evergreen Hall I, 2F

Biography:

Mohamad Sawan received a Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada, in 1990. He joined Polytechnique Montreal, Montreal, QC, in 1991, where he is currently a Professor of Microelectronics and Biomedical Engineering. He held the Canada Research Chair in Smart Medical Devices during 2001-2015 and is leading the Microsystems Strategic Alliance of Quebec (ReSMiQ). He has published more than 700 peer-reviewed papers, two books, ten book chapters, and 12 patents. His scientific research interests include the design and test of circuits and systems. Dr. Sawan is a Cofounder and Editor-in-chief of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, an Associate Editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, a Deputy Editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS-II (2011- 2014), and an Editor of the Springer Mixed-Signal Letters (2004-2014). He is the Founder of the International IEEE-NEWCAS Conference and of the Polystim Neurotechnologies Laboratory, and a Cofounder of the International IEEE-BioCAS Conference, and the International IEEE-ICECS. Dr. Sawan hosted, as general chair, the IEEE International Symposium of Circuits and Systems (ISCAS) in 2016 in Montreal, and he will host the IEEE International Engineering, Medicine and Biology Conference (EMBC) in 2020 in Montreal. He received several awards, among them the Shanghai Municipality International Collaboration Award, the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal, the medal of merit from the President of Lebanon, the Barbara Turnbull Award for spinal cord research, and the ACFAS- Bombardier and Jacques-Rousseau Awards. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the Engineering Institutes of Canada, and a Fellow of IEEE. He is also an Officer of the National Order of Quebec.


Abstract:

Epilepsy is one of main neurological disorders. Less than 3% of refractory to any medication patients can benefit from surgery. Also, presurgical monitoring to localize the seizure focus is a challenging step. Wearable and implantable brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) are introduced to face the localization of the seizure zone, its onset detection, and abortion of seizures before their emergence. On the other hand, on line prediction of seizures at least a half hour before its appearance is major challenges due to the complexity of brain behavior. This talk includes the description of a wearable helmet based on a fNIRS platform which is composed of an array of system-in-package based optodes proposed to measure hemoglobin variation in deep cortical levels. If a seizure is located but surgery cannot be accomplished, a multichannel mixed-signal detector and stimulator can be used to onset abort the seizures. Most important, prediction based on deep-learning algorithms is creating hope and significant expectation, that allow to prevent seizure while before its onset zone. Several research groups are conducting deep learning implementations to validate predicting algorithms using regular and intracortical EEGs to identify generators of seizure activity.





Contactless Sensing Solutions for Smart Society


  • Dr. Mitsuru Hiraki
  • Renesas Electronics Corp, Japan



  • Date: October 29, 2019 (Tuesday)
  • Time: 09:00 - 10:00
  • Venue: Evergreen Hall I, 2F

Biography:

Mitsuru Hiraki received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electronic engineering from the University of Tokyo, Japan, in 1983, 1985, and 1988, respectively. In 1988, he joined Hitachi, Ltd., where he worked on the research and development of BiCMOS circuits for high-speed logic LSIs, CMOS circuits for low-power applications, embedded flash memory for microcontrollers, and on-chip dc-dc converters for low-power system LSIs. In 2003, he moved to Renesas Technology Corp., which is now Renesas Electronics Corp. Since then, he has been working on the development of various kinds of analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits, high-speed interface circuits, and millimeter-wave radar systems. He served as a member of the Technical Program Committee of VLSI Circuit Symposium from 1998 to 2003. He also served as the Chairperson of the Technical Committee on Circuits and Systems in the IEICE from 2017 to 2018. Dr. Hiraki is a member of the IEICE and IEEE.


Abstract:

Contactless sensing solutions are expected to open the doors to various new applications for smart society. For the solutions to be used widely, they have to be cost effective. This paper summarizes two topics in contactless sensing solutions proposed by the author to make them cost effective. The first topic describes a capacitive sensing solution using a capacitance-to-digital converter (CDC). Integrating the CDC into a 32bit microcontroller reduces the total number of components on the system board and therefore reduces system cost. 3D gesture sensing was realized using the 32bit microcontroller in which the CDC was integrated. The second topic describes a millimeter-wave radar sensing solution using a new phased-array radar with an extremely small number of antennas and reduced signal processing complexity. A contactless vital sign monitoring system which tracks and continuously monitors the target person in the room was demonstrated using a prototype radar system.





Recent Progress of High-resolution Low-power ADC Architectures for IoT Use


  • Prof. Tatsuji Matsuura
  • Tokyo University of Science, Japan


  • Date: October 30, 2019 (Wednesday)
  • Time: 09:00 - 10:00
  • Venue: Evergreen Hall I, 2F

Biography:

Tatsuji Matsuura received the B.E. and M.E. degrees in mathematical engineering and instrumentation physics from the University of Tokyo, Japan, in 1976 and 1978, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in physical electronics from the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, in 2009. He joined the Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., in 1978, where he was engaged in the research and development of mixed-signal LSIs and high-speed CMOS A/D and D/A converters. From 1995 to 2003, he was with the Semiconductor and Integrated Circuit Group, Hitachi Ltd. From 2003 to 2012, he was with Renesas Technology and Renesas Electronics Corporation, where he was a Senior Chief Engineer, working on the development of RF transceivers, high-precision A/D converters, and advanced analog IP cores. From 2012 to 2014, he was a member of FIRST, Aihara Innovative Mathematical Modeling Project, JST. Currently, he is a Visiting Researcher of the Division of Intelligent System Engineering, Research Institute for Science & Technology, Tokyo University of Science from 2014. He has served as a member of the Technical Program Committee of CICC from 1996 to 2003 and of the ISSCC for the data converter sub-committee from 2005 to 2011. He is also a Visiting Professor at Gunma University. Dr. Matsuura is a member of the IEICE and IEEE.


Abstract:

Many sensor systems for IoT use strongly require high-resolution and low-power ADCs. Advantage of the SAR (successive approximation register) ADC architecture is its' low-power consumption features due to no op-amp use. However, only the matching of binary weighted capacitor array of the SAR ADC is not enough for high-precision and high-resolution ADC. On the other hand, delta-sigma ADC needs OP-amps, but it realizes high-resolution ADC due to the noise-shaping. Recently proposed noise-shaping SAR ADC is a promising architecture for high-resolution and low-power ADCs. I will discuss this architecture. Moreover, the other combination of SAR ADC architecture and delta-sigma techniques brings a new possibility.









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